Throughout her life, Pat Timmons-Goodson has broken down barriers to create opportunity for everyone.

Let’s send Pat to Congress.

Throughout her life, Pat Timmons-Goodson has broken down barriers to create opportunity for everyone.

Let’s send Pat to Congress.

MEET PAT

  • Born into a military family, Pat Timmons-Goodson grew up learning the value of a strong work ethic, service to her community, and commitment to others. And as the eldest child, she was expected to serve as the example for her five younger siblings.
  • Pat was one of the first African-American students to become a double Tar Heel, earning her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • After law school, Pat oversaw Fayetteville operations for the U.S. Census Office in Charlotte during the 1980 count, and then went on to become a respected Cumberland County assistant district attorney.
  • Pat became the first African-American woman on the Supreme Court of North Carolina in 2006. After stepping down from the Supreme Court in 2012, she was appointed to the United States Commission on Civil Rights in 2014 and was nominated by President Obama in 2016 to serve as a federal judge before the nomination was blocked by Richard Burr and Mitch McConnell.
  • Since her appointment to the United States Commission on Civil Rights, Pat has continued her fight to ensure everyone is treated equally under the law and to combat discrimination. Pat and her husband are the parents to two adult children and currently reside in Fayetteville.

Meet Pat

  • Born into a military family, Pat Timmons-Goodson grew up learning the value of a strong work ethic, service to her community, and commitment to others. And as the eldest child, she was expected to serve as the example for her five younger siblings.
  • Pat was one of the first African-American students to become a double Tar Heel, earning her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • After law school, Pat oversaw Fayetteville operations for the U.S. Census Office in Charlotte during the 1980 count, and then went on to become a respected Cumberland County assistant district attorney.
  • Pat became the first African-American woman on the Supreme Court of North Carolina in 2006. After stepping down from the Supreme Court in 2012, she was appointed to the United States Commission on Civil Rights in 2014 and was nominated by President Obama in 2016 to serve as a federal judge before the nomination was blocked by Richard Burr and Mitch McConnell.
  • Since her appointment to the United States Commission on Civil Rights, Pat has continued her fight to ensure everyone is treated equally under the law and to combat discrimination. Pat and her husband are the parents to two adult children and currently reside in Fayetteville.

IN THE NEWS

Contact the Campaign

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Mailing Address

Patricia Timmons-Goodson for Congress
PO Box 87856
Fayetteville, NC 28304

Paid for by Patricia Timmons-Goodson for Congress.